May 27, 2024  
2023 - 2025 Voorhees University Catalog 
  
2023 - 2025 Voorhees University Catalog

Support Services and Programs



Voorhees University accepts students with various interests and different levels of academic performance. Because the University wants our students to succeed – in the classroom, on campus, and beyond, it has services and programs to meet those distinct needs and interests of such students.

The goals of these services and programs are:

  1. to facilitate student learning and degree completion by providing a comprehensive array of programs, resources, and services that focus on academic goal-setting, skill development, personal transition, and effective decision making; and
  2. to increase enrollment, retention, and graduation rates as well as to enhance student success by helping them develop essential strategies and skills to succeed.

These goals are realized through the collaboration of services and programs sponsored by the Academic Affairs (AA) and Student Affairs (SA) Divisions:

  • Academic Peer-Tutoring (AA)
  • The Academic Center for Excellence (AA)
  • Early Alert Referral System (SA)
  • First Eight Weeks (SA)
  • Freshman Seminar Course (AA)
  • Orientation Programs for New and Transfer Students (Tiger Connect/Fall and Spring) (SA)
  • Placement Testing (AA)
  • Student Retention Program/The Center of Retention (COR) (SA)
  • TRIO Student Support Services Program/Disabled Student Services (AA)

These services are free and provided to students enrolled at Voorhees as part of the University’s effort to help students realize their educational goals. Students should take advantage of these programs and services that offer assistance and support when they need it. Remember, the services are here to provide help.

Services And Programs

Academic Peer Tutoring is offered through The Academic Center for Excellence (ACE) and is available, free of charge, to all students enrolled at Voorhees University. Upper-division Peer-Tutors are accessible not only to assist students who are struggling with their academics but also to those students who would like an extra boost towards achieving the desired level of success in their classes.

The Peer-Tutors are available to meet one-on-one or as a group, drop-in setting; in a residential hall, or a classroom tutoring session to provide learning assistance. All of these tutorial formats are used as a supplement to academic instruction.

All Peer-Tutors undergo a rigorous departmental application and screening process followed by a training program to help them assess the best way to work with their students.

The Academic Center for Excellence (ACE) is a comprehensive supplemental instruction program designed to provide 21st Century engagement for students based on direct supplemental instruction and interaction with faculty in identified courses. Supplemental Instruction (SI) is an academic support model that utilizes peer-assisted study sessions and faculty-led study sessions that parallel specific courses.

ACE provides regularly scheduled review sessions on course materials outside the classroom that directly reflect and are related to the courses students have enrolled in. Meeting the needs of Millennial, Generation Y, and Generation Z students, the ACE, SI study sessions are informal seminars in which students compare notes, discuss readings, predict test items and develop tools for an effective organization in a student-centered and inviting setting. The ACE SI program targets traditionally difficult courses, including, but not limited to all 100-level and 200-level English and mathematics courses as they are deemed the gateway courses to student success.

The ACE services are offered to all students in a targeted course; however, students can also request general tutoring and assistance on graduate applications and essays. ACE targets high-risk courses rather than high-risk students.

Features of the ACE include:

  • Operational hours that optimize student engagement beyond traditional 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. when most Millennial, Generation Y, and Generation Z students are prone to study.
  • Supplemental Instruction (SI) delivered by peer tutors, faculty facilitators, and online support programs.
  • Academic Success Series, a series of academic support strategies through face-to-face sessions, short webinars, and individual and small group meetings (e.g. How to Study for University Courses; How to Maximize Notetaking; Effective University Reading, and others)
  • Living and Learning Tutorials based on Supplemental Instruction and Academic Success Series established in each residence hall
  • Off-Campus Instructional Site support to include: Academic Success Series, face-to-face sessions, short webinars, and individual and small group meetings

Early Alert Referral System (EARS) helps provide support to students who are experiencing academic and social problems. It is designed to intervene in the face of student issues through the assistance of counseling, tutorial referrals, and/or agency referrals, and the Student Affairs’ “Student Retention Intervention Team” is available to provide that support.

Faculty, staff, and students are encouraged to utilize this electronic referral procedure to make students aware of the University’s concern when they are showing low attendance or having other problems that affect their performance. Upon receiving the counseling copy, the Early Alert “Student Retention Intervention Team” Member determines the need for further intervention and initiates appropriate action.

The Early Alert Referral System is a valuable retention service both to the students and to Voorhees University.

The First Eight Weeks allow students to become more engaged and accountable for their academic progress early in the semester. In an effort to increase the currently enrolled freshman and sophomore students’ grade point averages, the program collaborates with both the Financial Aid Office and the Office of the Registrar and Student Records to obtain the names of students who are at the baseline of facing academic probation. The Student Retention Program is responsible for assessing the needs of students and determining those who need additional academic or other assistance to assist them in becoming proactive in their education. Appropriate referrals are made so that students can receive services before the mid-term week.

Freshman Seminar Course (FS 120) is the extension of the Orientation Week Program and all entering freshmen enroll into this course their first semester. The course is designed to assist students in making the transition from high school to University, acquaint them with the concept and value of a liberal arts education and the overall value of higher education.

It is also intended to increase student’s persistence and success in University by providing them with the academic, personal, and life management tools needed to function effectively and complete their course of study.

Orientation Programs for New and Transfer Students are designed to motivate, inform, and assist students to ensure that they develop the necessary attitudes, skills, and motivations to adjust to the requirements and demands of University life. All first-time freshmen and transfer student are required to participate in these Programs, which begins at the beginning and continues throughout their first year.

The Fall and Spring “R.O.A.R. Welcome Week” Orientation Programs provides students the opportunity to be introduced to key campus personnel and services; have dialogues with and ask questions of representatives from such offices like Financial Aid, Housing, Student Affairs, Academic Affairs, Campus Safety, Counseling, Retention Program, TRIO Student Support Services Program, other educational support resources, placement testing, library, academic divisions, student organizations, Admissions, and Enrollment Management. An extension of the New Student Orientation Week Programs are continued through the “Freshman Seminar” Course (FS 120) where all new students are required to enroll in this course their first semester.

The Summer “Tiger Connect” Orientation Program provides a wonderful one-day “jumpstart” activity that offers early placement testing, an opportunity to visit and learn more about the University, hear a variety of informative speakers, be introduced to key campus personnel and services, participate in parent workshops, a campus tour, have a chance to begin a connection with faculty, staff and upperclassmen and get questions answered from key offices. There is no cost to attend this day of awareness, excitement, and fun.

Placement Testing is administered through The Academic Center for Excellence. Voorhees University offers placement testing in English and mathematics to assess students’ proficiency in communication and computational skills.

All new students who are required to take the placement tests are placed in the English and mathematics courses based upon their level of proficiency in each area. (See additional information about Placement Testing on page 46 of the catalog.)

Student Retention Program is designed to enhance academic excellence, to help create greater success for the students, and to increase course completion and graduation rates. All of the University’s services and programs work together to make this a successful program. Any student failing to meet the standards as listed in the current Voorhees University Catalog would qualify for assistance under the program. The Center of Retention (COR) coordinates the Student Retention Program, the Early Alert Referral System (EARS), and the Student Retention Intervention Team.

The TRIO Student Support Services Program (SSSP) is an educational opportunity program funded by the U.S. Department of Education hosted by Voorhees University. To qualify, students must be U.S. citizens or nationals, enrolled full-time at the institution, have an academic need, and meet the federal government criteria of low-income, disabled, and/or first-generation University students.

The mission is to improve students’ adjustment to the rigors and demands of University life; increase University retention and graduation rates, and improve the academic success of its participants. The program provides many opportunities that increase the chances of University success for students who qualify for membership. The services below are available free of charge to its members. 

Academic Advising, Planning and Tutoring Career, Graduate/ Professional Schools Information and Visitations University Success Coaches
Computer Lab Access Disabled Student Services Support Early Warning Referral
Educational/Cultural Enrichment Activities FAFSA Assistance Financial/Economic Literacy Information
Grant-In-Aid Funds Monthly Meetings New Member TRIO-SSS Survival Packet
Peer Tutors/Peer Mentors Personal Development/ Motivational Counseling Returning Member TRIO-SSS Survival Packet
Self-Help Outreach Center Student Success Workshop Series: In Search of Character - Learn How to Succeed -Mindfulness - Motivation4University Success S.P.A. Appointments (Success Plan of Action)

Disabled Student Services are offered through the TRIO Student Support Services Program. This component coordinates support services for Voorhees’ students with disabilities who are members of the TRIO SSS Program. The goals of these services are:

  • to enable students with disabilities to participate in and benefit from Voorhees’ programs and activities by providing services accommodations, and consultation for receiving assistive technology;
  • to ensure the Voorhees’ environment is free of both physical barriers and barriers of attitude;
  • to encourage students with disabilities to become as independent and self-reliant as possible and to inform students that it is their responsibility to secure services and accommodations;
  • to provide information and consultation about specific disabilities to the entire Voorhees’ community; and
  • to make sure that students have access to a copy of “Students with Disabilities Preparing for Postsecondary Education: Know Your Rights and Responsibilities.”

THE ADA AND SECTION 504. The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) and Section 504 of the Federal Rehabilitation Act of 1973 were developed to help individuals with disabilities avoid discrimination based on their disability status. These laws provide guidelines for public and private agencies to provide access to individuals with disabilities. The ADA upholds and extends the standards covered in Section 504, and is thus more comprehensive and broader in scope. It offers civil rights protections to individuals with disabilities and defines what constitutes a disability and what a reasonable accommodation is in terms of providing equal access.

Do I have to inform the University that I have a disability?
Although you do not have to report your disability, the University wants you to receive all of the necessary services that you deserve to assist you in your success. To provide you with an academic adjustment, you must identify yourself as having a disability. Likewise, you should let the University know about your disability if you want to ensure that you are assigned to accessible facilities. In any event, your disclosure of a disability is always voluntary and confidential.

What documentation should I provide?
Students requesting accommodations based on disability status should, through their designated administrator, provide the University with appropriate medical documentation. The documentation must be in written form from a licensed health care professional who is qualified to diagnose the disability and recommend specific accommodations. An Individualized Education Plan (IEP) or Section 504 Plan can be submitted to help determine services that were effective for you.

Services
Students can be provided with classroom adjustments, communication with professors, and academic support such as copying of notes, loaning of tape recorders, making available a computer or typewriter, advising for registration and tutoring. Further assistance will be given on advising students, parents, faculty, and staff regarding the needs of the disabled students.

Confidentiality
Access to disabled students’ files is limited. Specific information on a student’s disability can only be shared with the student’s written permission and/or on a need-to-know basis. This information does not become part of a student’s transcript or permanent record.

The W. Franklin Evans Honors University Program

Objectives

The W. Franklin Evans Honors University is designed to attract, recognize, reward, and advance academic excellence by providing additional or expanded opportunities for the ablest and most motivated students in the University.

Eligibility

Voorhees University selects students on the basis of their outstanding scholastic abilities which include their SAT or ACT scores, cumulative grade point averages, and leadership qualities.

Eligible students at Voorhees may apply for admission to the W. Franklin Evans Honors University. The University itself usually invites eligible students to apply, but students may apply on their own initiative. They may do so during their freshman or sophomore years but no later than the first semester of their junior year. The W. Franklin Evans Honors University may invite eligible students for an interview. Within ten days following the interview, the Honors Program informs the applicants in writing of the decision to admit or not to admit them.

Students who are Presidential or Dean’s Scholar may apply for membership during their first semester. However, they will not be eligible for membership until they have completed a minimum of 15 hours toward graduation and acquired a cumulative GPA of 3.20 or above.

All other enrolled students who have completed at least 15 credit hours with a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.20 (on a 4.0) scale may also apply. For additional information, interested students should contact the Coordinator of the W. Franklin Evans Honors University.

Membership Obligations

  • Maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.20. If the GPA falls below 3.20, the student will be placed on probation for one semester.
  • Engage actively in the programs and activities of the W. Franklin Evans Honors University.
  • Demonstrate a commitment and capacity for scholarly pursuits.
  • Show evidence of application to graduate or professional school during the senior year.

Probationary Criteria

If an honors scholar’s grade point average grade falls below the 3.20 requirement, he or she must achieve the minimum 3.20 GPA, over the course of the following semester. He or she will then resume membership in good standing. If not, membership in the W. Franklin Evans Honors University will be terminated. The student may submit to the W. Franklin Evans Honors University Coordinator a letter of appeal regarding the termination if he or she wishes.
 

Honors University Courses

Honors courses are writing intensified, technologically enhanced, and internationally focused. Honors courses are open to any Voorhees University student with the permission of the Instructor, Academic Advisor or Department Chairperson. Students may earn additional honors course credit via Honors Contracts. Students interested in more information should confer with the Coordinator of the W. Franklin Evans Honors University or the Department Chair.

*HONORS 121  - Honors Scholars Seminar I (2 semester credit hours)
*HONORS 122  - Honors Scholars Seminar II (2 semester credit hours)
*HON 210-Special Topics (3 semester credit hours)
*HONORS 330  -Honors Independent Study (3 semester credit hours)
*HONORS 331  -Honors Research I (3 semester credit hours)
*HON 332-Honors Research II (3 semester credit hours)

Core Course for Academic Competitions

A series of honors courses will be developed to provide students an opportunity to earn honors course credit for participating in academic competitions. NOTE: Students will be able to take the course for up to eight semesters at one credit hour per course.

*HONORS 110  -Academic Tournament 1 semester credit hour (A,B,C,D,E,F,G,F)
*HONORS 111  -Argument and Debate 1 semester credit hour (A,B,C,D,E,F,G,F)
*HONORS 112  -Model and African Union 1 semester credit hour (A,B,C,D,E,F,G,F)

The Louis Stokes Carolina Alliance For Minority Participation (LS-SCAMP)

The Louis Stokes Carolina Alliance for Minority Participation is the oldest program in the state of South Carolina that develops minority and underrepresented undergraduate students in the areas of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. A major goal of the program is to increase the number of students pursuing a doctorate in the STEM fields. LS-SCAMP is funded by the National Science Foundation and provides financial and other support to minority students majoring in STEM.

The activities include STEM tutoring, mentoring, lectures, conferences, graduate school application preparation workshops, research internship preparation workshops, and GRE preparation workshops.

Career Pathways Initiative

The Carolina Cluster Pathway Program, Benedict University, Claflin University, and Voorhees University have received part of a $35.4 million grant under the UNCF® Career Pathways Initiative (CPI), funded by Lilly Endowment Inc. The grant will help the institutions design and implement programs to improve employment outcomes for graduates. The announcement came after a yearlong process that included a multi-phased grant process that initially targeted 87 eligible public and private HBCUs and PBIs.

The Carolina Cluster Pathway Program (C2P2) will prepare students for high-paying private and public sector occupations in the Carolinas and elsewhere. It seeks to do this by guided pathways, curricular enhancements, and integrated co-curricular engagement. In its initiative, the C2P2 will also include the formation of corporate and public advisory boards.

Purpose: Dedicated to transforming the student experience to enhance educational and employment outcomes for 21st-century success.

The Grant Award: Three South Carolina Universitys received a $6 million grant from the United Negro University Fund Career Pathways Initiative.

The Carolina Cluster Structure:

  • Carolina Cluster State office: $1.8 million
  • Benedict University: $1.5 million
  • Claflin University: $1.5 million
  • Voorhees University: 1.2 million

The State Coordinating Office will direct, support, and monitor all of the activities of the awarded institutions. Voorhees University will focus on three areas.

  • Curriculum Alignment
  • Intentional Co-Curricular Engagement
  • Guided Career Pathway

Curriculum Alignment:
The Voorhees University curriculum strategy will ensure that our students are being taught based on the industry-standard requirements, improving their chances of success. Our Curriculum alignment will:

  • Develop revised curricula that include specific learning objectives for career exploration and career plan development into our University’s first-year experience courses
  • Reform majors and coursework to align with workforce needs, industry expectations, and high demand growth fields
  • Incorporate employable minors and certificate programs
  • Provide professional development to faculty and staff.

Intentional Co-Curricular Engagement
Findings from surveys by NACE and Harris Interactive show that employers prefer new hires who have completed an internship and believe Universitys should expand opportunities for experiential learning. Voorhees’s intentional co-curricular engagement will require embedding opportunities for meaningful work-based learning experiences into the curriculum without extending students’ time to graduate.

Guided Career Pathway
To better prepare our students for a successful transition to their careers, Voorhees University will provide a guided career pathway program for all students. This program will provide a specific focus for each class year, based on their interest, assessments, and career goals utilizing the National Career Cluster Framework. Individualized plans will include co-curricular activities designed to prepare students for immediate employment and/or graduate and professional school.

NOTE:
To determine if these measures are successfully preparing our students for careers in their field, Voorhees University will establish various means of tracking the students’ progress, work experience placement, and career or graduate school admission. The result will then be used to improve the program as needed.

The Career Pathways Seminar Series

The Career Pathways Seminar Series is a guided pathways Universitys best practice in curriculum realignment, designed to map out academic programs to create educationally coherent pathways, each with clearly defined learning outcomes that build across the curriculum and are aligned with requirements for further education and career advancement in the given field.

CP 120: Career Pathways I - Freshman Experience I Course Description

The primary goal of Freshman Seminary is simple - we want you to be successful here at Voorhees University. Through your enrollment in this course, you will be given the tools necessary for your success in your academic endeavors; you will begin to explore your major and make the connection between your selected major and the appropriate career pathways; you will enhance your studying and learning abilities, engage in the critical thinking process, and become an active member in the Voorhees University community. The skills you develop from this course are essential for your achievement at the University.

Freshman Seminary is taught in a seminar format. This is an active style involving you with reading, questions, activities, discussions, and more. Interaction and community are key concepts and foundations of this course. Do not expect to sit back and listen to your instructor’s lecture - be prepared to be actively involved with your instructor and classmates during the class!

Student Learning Outcomes

Students will:

  1. Explore and articulate selected academic majors as career options.
  2. Learn about career and internship opportunities.
  3. Develop listening and Note-Taking Skills.
  4. Analyze reliability, validity, and credibility of sources.
  5. Improve and build upon test-preparation and test-taking skills.
  6. Design effective time management strategies.
  7. Know the rights and responsibilities of students in the University community.
  8. Understand how to manage conflict.
  9. Discuss and consider information and viewpoints that differ from personal worldviews

CP 121: Career Pathways II - Freshman Experience II Course Description

In this class, we will work together to make your transition to Voorhees’s University successful. We will focus on developing your plan for personal, academic, and career success through self-evaluation, class discussion, experiential learning, and service-learning. Freshman Seminar is designed to equip you with skills that will help you develop the soft skills needed to be successful in your selected career, provide you with enhanced knowledge of your major and career field, and provide opportunities to network and engage in your selected field of study. This class will help you develop holistically as you complete your second semester of University and provide you with the opportunity to begin preparing for success in your chosen career.

Student Learning Outcomes Students will:

  1. Demonstrate skills and strategies related to academic success, including writing proficiency, critical thinking, study skills, academic integrity, and analysis and application of academic content.
  2. Develop a holistic understanding of the University, including navigation of the academic
  3. structure and requirements, utilization of appropriate campus resources, and participation in comprehensive co-curricular engagement activities.
  4. Reflect upon how campus engagement helps them reach goals and/or overcome personal challenges.
  5. Examine the effectiveness of their communication and interactions with members of the university community.
  6. Demonstrate understanding of core workforce competencies
  7. Participate in major field studies designed to expose students to real-world information regarding specific majors and careers.
  8. Research a pioneer/trailblazer in a selected major.
  9. Discuss and understand the meaning of experiential learning and the impact it can have on one’s career.
  10. Research and identify opportunities for internships.
  11. Select and apply for at least 3-5 summer internship opportunities.
  12. Complete 10 hours of Service Learning.

CP 201: Career Pathways I - Sophomore Experience I Course Description

This course is designed to provide continuous insight into the job search process and exploration of the importance of developing and using soft skills in a business setting. Students will further explore the connection between potential careers and academic programs as well as Identify and articulate skills relevant to the global workforce acquired through coursework.

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Students will develop plans for future internships, scholarships, coursework, and academic and extracurricular practices which will enhance their ability to secure meaningful employment in desired fields upon graduation.
  2. Through self-assessment exercises, lively discussion, and thought-provoking activities, students will identify and reflect upon their values, interests, and skills and then connect them to career options.
  3. Students will explore the eight most critical Workforce Competencies valued by employers and learn how to develop those competencies.
  4. Students will discuss ways to research their career paths and learn targeted search strategies to achieve meaningful professional goals.
  5. Research and develop a plan to secure internships
  6. Complete service learning projects throughout the semester and finalize capstone project, to be presented to the University and within the community.

CP 202: Career Pathways I - Sophomore Experience I Course Description

This course is designed to give students an overview of the job search process and will also explore the importance of developing and using soft skills in a business setting. A variety of topics will be explored: researching career opportunities including internships, articulating a vision through a personal statement or resume, interacting in teams, and learning how to empower oneself and others. Guest speakers will enhance the class environment, allowing students to learn from leaders in the community and the University.

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Apply job search techniques and write for a variety of purposes and audiences.
  2. Create necessary job search documents and demonstrate appropriate interview skills 3. Demonstrate ability to work in teams
  3. Identify and demonstrate techniques of clear communication and effective professional business relation skills, including enthusiasm and attitude, teamwork, networking, problem-solving and critical thinking, and professionalism.
  4. Identify and demonstrate effective resolution techniques for workplace conflicts.
  5. Complete service learning projects throughout the semester and begin work on a capstone project, which will be presented to the University and within the community.

CP 301: Career Pathways I - Junior Experience I Course Description

This course is designed to further explore the expectations and demands of professional career development. Students will increase their knowledge of career opportunities, discipline-specific career competencies, and networking strategies. A variety of topics will be explored: leadership, critical and creative thinking, personal ethics, strategic planning, and professional decorum. Guest speakers will enhance the class environment, allowing students to learn from leaders in the community and the University.

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Students will successfully execute career placement plans, which will aid in the attainment of experiential learning relative to respective fields of study.
  2. Students will apply soft skills and job-related competencies related to career success.
  3. Students will participate in peer-reviewed employment case studies to increase career self-efficacy.
  4. Students will research effective job search plans.

CP 302: Career Pathways II - Junior Experience II Course Description

This course is a continuation of CP 301  and will continue to explore the expectations and demands of professional career development. Students will increase their knowledge of career opportunities, discipline-specific career competencies, and networking strategies. A variety of topics will be explored: leadership, critical and creative thinking, personal ethics, strategic planning, and professional decorum. Guest speakers will enhance the class environment, allowing students to learn from leaders in the community and the University.

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Students will successfully execute career placement plans, which will aid in the attainment of experiential learning relative to respective fields of study.
  2. Students will apply soft skills and job-related competencies related to career success.
  3. Students will participate in peer-reviewed employment case studies to increase career self-efficacy
  4. Students will research effective job search plans.
  5. Students will create a networking and career mentorship portfolio
  6. Students will explore graduate and professional school opportunities.

CP 401: Career Pathways I - Senior Experience I Course Description

This course is designed to provide students with an advanced overview of job search approaches. Students will apply their knowledge of career opportunities, discipline-specific career competencies, and networking strategies. A variety of topics will be explored: leadership, critical and creative thinking, personal ethics, strategic planning, and professional decorum. Guest speakers will enhance the class environment, allowing students to learn from leaders in the community and the University.

Student Learning Outcomes

  1. Students will execute their career placement plans.
  2. Students will complete their career portfolios.
  3. Students will explore alternative career options.
  4. Students will expand and grow their career and mentorship networks.
  5. Students will follow-up on graduate and professional school opportunities.

CP 402: Career Pathways II - Senior Experience II Course Description

This course is a continuation of CP 420 and will continue to develop advanced job search approaches. Students will apply their knowledge of career opportunities, discipline-specific career competencies, and networking strategies. A variety of topics will be explored: leadership, critical and creative thinking, personal ethics, strategic planning, and professional decorum. Guest speakers will enhance the class environment, allowing students to learn from leaders in the community and the University.

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Students will execute their career placement plans.
  2. Students will complete their career portfolios.
  3. Students will explore alternative career options.
  4. Students will expand and grow their career and mentorship networks.
  5. Students will follow-up on graduate and professional school opportunities.